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leisure time, save for retirement, and pay for education so they can grow up earning more than their parents. this. the weekend the american economy is not creating any jobs of any kind -- enough jobs of any kind. to many americans cannot have the skills they need. the path to a prosperous middle class is a combination of a vibrant economy that creates and positive role. federal policies on the national debt, taxes and regulations, allclass job creation. opening and growing a business. they are afraid of getting hit with a massive tax increase to pay off this debt. one of the leading causes of our growing future debt is the way medicare is currently designs for the future -- designed for the future. the sooner we act, the likelier we can do it without making any currently in the system, like paul ryan's and my mother. a complicated tax code is also hampering the creation of jobs. you cannot open a business if uncertain. that is allied i oppose the present's plans to raise taxes the -- that is why i oppose the dent in the debt. over half of the private sector workers and america
. this will improve education for our children. why are you giving it a big f. >> there is no relionship between test scores and the amnt of time spept in the classroom. not in math or science or in anything. u.s. students spend more time in the class rom than kid in the chin affin land and japan. that helps one person and that ishe teacher unions where the recip yepts of the spending. if you want to help the kids privatize the system. before the late 1880s it was home schooled and private and more choice and better o come for all. >> john, is it worth it or the education of the kids is worth it? >> i don't think there is a correlation. i think johnathon is right here. i don't agree with privatization of all schools. 20 years we had a best education system . we still have great teachers and school accident, but as a system, we are failing and we are falling down behind other countries. you look at oecd inwe are falling back every year. it is not the amount much time, it is what they are getting while they are there. and we don't have the ability to merit base teacher or students and we have a problem
-creates with their own experiences. the process of mourning, which is not just formal school education, but interactions with her parents about the whole world is a very important part of the development of intelligence. you could do a perfect job of re-creating the neo cortex and i wouldn't do anything useful, just like a newborn is limited in scale without an education. in fact, that's an important paradigm for the a.i., artificial intelligence is to them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neo cortex is as opposed to the blame? >> guest: gets old brain and the neighboring. only mammals have the neo cortex. early mammals emerged over 100 million years ago. the neo cortex is the size of a postage stamp. it's as thin as stamp and basically the outer layer, the new ryan of the brain. it's capable of thinking is hierarchical fashion. >> host: that the part of the brain you are focusing on? >> guest: these early mammals was limited, but enabled them to learn no schools -- new skills. but they were able to adapt. that was not so much of an advantage because the environment to change quickly. it took tho
services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate this very much from the government of san francisco and i thanks our community at large and everyone who is here and for them, i thank them also and we will try our be
. >> educational leaders and staff, more than 85 musicals showcased what they have to offer. john lewis talked to some parents as they shop around to find the best schools for their children. >> it was not a game but education that brought a danger of hundreds of students and parents. >> i have tried to find a school in my community. >> by and large, this -- >> it is our job. >> this is the sixth year for the charter highlighting selective enrollment. contentious issue in chicago. on friday, for more public charter schools were approved for the city. at the same time, closing neighborhood schools run by the district. there is also the possibility of a chartered network sharing space with an under enrolled school. >> we have to be open to considering other options. the quirks charter schools are privately run but they take public money. >> we all need to be working together. we all want to the same thing. we cannot keep kids trapped in the system. >> across town on the west side hundreds of others gathered to talk about reinforcing public schools and said of enhancing the charters. >> i hope th
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
support groups, curriculum based parent education classes, parent leadership, and community building, promoting activities that promote school readiness so children are ready for kindergarten and school success so children are graduating from high school. we provide family additional support in navigating the resources and coordinating support in times of need. most importantly family resource centers provide a warm, safe, fun place for families to go where they get respect. they're listened to and they are contributing members of the family resource center, so i am grateful for the opportunity to be part of this violence prevention strategy and i am thrilled that we're starting young, so thank you all, and please support us in the family resource center. thank you. [applause] >> thank you laurel and our next speaker is the executive director of apa, the actual contracted agency to deliver the services here in sunny dale. please welcome our next guest. >> hello everyone. thank you deanna and laurel and certainly mayor lee. i have a lot of people to acknowledge because it took a
thing. there are possibly other things which are trickier, like trying to improve the education system, but sort of these fundamental things, what we need to work on. not just that we're growing a little faster in 2013, but for many years there after. >> christine, you make this point all the time, actually. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at these numbers and compare the average to those with a college degree. it's half. the unplace of employment rate is half. >> it is, but i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. so they've got a degree, debt, they're not in the labor market yet, so they haven't been able to get into that group that has half the employment of everything else. they're having a tough time and as we know, that first job you have, that first foot on the first rung -- >> those sort, up to the age of 30 is higher. up to 11. >> that first step on the ladder is so important to your lifetime earnings, achievement. as a country, it's eati ining y if you can't figure out a good edge kax, but there's an opp
and in a way that recertified higher education. customized and better. >> one of the themes we've been talking with authors here at freedom test about the moralism of a moralism about capitalism. is there a moral component interview? >> is the subject of the next book coming out at the end of the month -- the end of august. capitalism has moral because it's about getting real world needs another people and it's a free market transaction is a reciprocal exchange. the person provides benefits to the other. george gilder who i saw you interviewing talks about it as giving. each side gets to the other. so capitalism -- basically people who believe in big government via free market transaction is a one-sided transaction that is each side its benefits. it may not be ideal, but there's benefit always in a transaction otherwise would not occur because it's in a free market. no one is forcing you to enter into this exchange and that's why there's benefits to both sides. if european forests, the unilateral transaction is one that takes place between the individual and government. >> was your enthusiasm
of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their heritage was important, and important to be proud of being indian, and so that gave them reasons to study harder and to be a better student and stay in school. where you come from is important and what your background is and your family, so we have to have indian education. i don't think i'm a hero. i just had a job to do, and did it with the chi
for something fun and educational to do together. nature spot quest is our spot. opened in march 2011 with more than 7,000 square feet of interactive educational things to do and see, the exhibit has the feel of a playground and the educational tools of classroom. every nook and cranny offers children a new adventure. unlike traditional museums, at naturequest children are challenged from self-discovery to explore and be curious in a hands-on environment just like real scientists. with over 100 interactive encounters to choose from, a few of my son's favorites include the clubhouse build in the trees and human fossils and the simulating river that seems to be swimming when they step on it. >> naturequest is this amazingly fun world that's scientifically lis tick. you can explore from the oceans and top of the mountains and everywhere you look there's something to do, something to find. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? >> not much, but my son has so much fun exploring he doesn't lielz his little brain is working too. ann clair stapleton, cnn, atlanta. [ male announcer ] when it come
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
results because they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the seco
and learning environmental education. they are getting paid. it is work and helping to steward the land and learning leadership skills and i want to name a couple of folks from that program. kimberly who runs the vote tear programming and zoey and brenda from green acres. where is brenda? she's not here and carolyn from the port who we have worked incredibly close with. [applause] just to conclude there has been a lot of talk about team lately. chris bochy said it yesterday and the mayor said it yesterday and this morning. this is a team and great things happen when we work together and looking around the room there are so critical members of the team and putting our parks and rec and open space, the quality of life for san franciscans ahead of self and that includes the port. it includes department of public works. it includes public utilities commission and the local unions and the park alliance and friends at bicycle coalition and the rand off institute and center for environmental yesterday. there are so many incredible partners contributing to making this city better and it's
coming together. and what we do is we work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded
people, educate them, maybe some good of good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, t
their job is to maximize the return on investment so they can continue to provide an education to these entitled, stupid, brats. anyway, you know who still hasn't been told about climate change? >> it is better he doesn't know. mr. bolton, uh par tied and fossil fuels, they are the same thing, right? >> yes. if they want to disinvest their endowment let them pay higher tuition or let their parents pay higher tuition. why stop there? if you don't like oil and gas companies why not the companies. divest from them too. and let's get to the center of the controversy. it is not just carbon-based fuels these people object to. they are carbon-based life forms. let's get to that next. >> and the life forms they disagree with are the ones they want to divest from. how will they go on spring break? when they are stoned out of their minds how are they going to get the pizza guy to get on his mow ped and come over and deliver the pizza without the use of fossil fuels. i never understand why they call them foss till fuels. i didn't know there were a lot of dead things underground, sandra, b
competitiveness to education. the new number one in most cases, a scandinavian country. what is the secret sauce? we'll dig into it. >>> but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here's something president obama could probably do by himself that would be a single accomplish money of the his presidency. end the war on tar rohr. for the first time since 9/11 an official has raised the prospect. johnson said in a speech to the oxford last week as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured such that as al qaeda as wi know it has been effectively destroyed. at that point, he says, our efforts should no longer be considered an armed conflict. you might not realize it, but we're still living in a state of war. this is the longest since the civil war, world war i, world war ii. it grants the president and federal government extraordinary authorities, effectively extends civil liberties for anyone the gov
to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever come together and get things done, here is something president obama could do probably by himself that would be a single accomplishment of his presidency, end the war on terror. for the first time since 9/11, an administration official has raised this prospect. said in a speech to the oxford union last week, that as the battle against al qaeda continues, there will be come a tipping point as so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda have killed or captures such as al qaeda as we know it has been effectively destroyed. our efforts should no lo loaninger -- this is the longest period that the united states has lived in such a situation. longer than the civil war, world war i, world war ii, it grants the government extraordinary authorities and effectively suspends civil liberties for anyone the government deems the minute and also keeps us at a permanent war feeting in all kinds of ways, endsing thi
to raise a child". it truly does and takes everyone of us and people in the community, our education community, our native american health center community, our crc community because once they leave us then somebody else has to pick up where we left off and carry that ball to educate the students and i see the students and it's good to see you guys and i thank you for being here and honor all of us, and keep your prayers open for hinttelethat it will always be there. if i can hang in for a couple more years i hope to retire. knock on wood. thanks for being here and each of you drive safely and thank you for your prayers and blessings and those that come before us and those coming into the world. hi pop. [applause] >> shirley, shirley. >> all my x's kids of taught by shirley. i'm kidding. and again with great pleasure welcome janet king to the stage. [applause] >> hello everybody. i have the great honor and privilege to introduce and to introduce karen harrison who is also receiving this award tonight. karen harrison is a registered nurse and clinic manager at the native americ
housing. and we're really excited to be teamed up with osb and oewd on this venture to bring education about the importance of disabled access. and it's our aim to really make sure that all these small businesses are inclusive to all patrons with the space that has the accessible upgrades and this a-d-a compliance. thank you. (applause) >> and one of the most important parts of the program of investing neighborhoods is making sure we're listening to the needs of our neighborhood partners. and to speak to those issues, are some of the small businesses who know how important it is to make sure we're getting the word out and who want to make sure their neighbors, small business neighbors are supported. one of those people is angela tickler, the hardware store across the street who will speak to the importance of this program now. (applause) >> angela. >> good morning. i'm also the president of our local merchants association. and, so, we have done a lot of work with carmen and katie's help over the last few years trying to educate particularly our mono lingual merchants in the area how t
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >> it is more and more typical. all-purpose of the charter school movement was to create new public schools, held accountable but free from most rules and regulation. but government encroaches everyday on people who want to start schools. john: the blob in charge they don't that competition state education department even the bes
, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> we have been telling you about these two unlikely but powerful men who have teamed up to fight for same sex marriage in california. they say it is not a matter of being republican or democrat, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too
against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i wa excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reformays the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 becau of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application d 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >> it is more and mo
is given the economy of prince george's county, the education level and the demographics of prince george's county, here's the question. is this the best that prince george's county has to offer when it comes to public service? >> i can't believe that it is. on one hand, i just think that people need to step up. and get involved. so that you don't have to make a choice between two individuals like this. >> well, the governor will and can now choose someone else. and mr. hall has indicated he may appeal the decision. >> and that's his right to appeal. >> he also has a right to run. >> he has a right to run for office, should he choose to. >> the brother of former d.c. chair kwame brown, charged with bank fraud. charged with claiming for more income than he earned for a loan modification. that's the same charge that led to kwame brown's resignation as chair after his efforts to buy a boat. this is pretty ironic. >> ironic and unfortunate. >> here again we're talking about public image. although his brother wasn't in public life, but it was related to the brother who was the chair of the d.c
is the fact that veterans the most educated, highest skilled military ever to enter the civilian work force and they are our nation's next work force and employers need to be aware of that and in the book we talk about turn key methodologies and ways companies can reach out to veterans and recruit and retain them and use the skills that they have to offer. it's a great talent pool. >> specifically what are the specialized skills and training vets can offer employers? >> vets bring many things to the table as far as employment is concerned. they work in teams. they're focused on the mission. they are trustworthy, they always arrive on time, they're very punctual so they really bring quite a few things to the table but one of the most important things i really wanted to talk about related to this was the vets military friendly 100 list which lists 100 companies that have competed to be on this list and it's a great resource for veterans in maryland because you can sort that list according to state and so there's 70 companies that do business that are on the list right here in maryland and so
for public comment. anyone from the public like to comment, please come forward. >> we've educated thousands of people in san francisco in every district. we are collaborating and reaching out to community groups, the bike kitchen and the bike project to reach out to under represented audiences such as colors and bay view and hunters point. these funds will help support efforts and improve bike safety. thank you. >> thank you very much any other member of the public like to comment. seeing none, we will close public comment. can we move this forward with recommendation and conditions amendments. so moved and we will take that without objection. >> item ten recommended program up -- cycle three lifetime transportation program to three san francisco municipal transportation agency projects. >> [inaudible]. >> the board has program access to mta bus restoration project in state transit assistance or funds to low income program. the mta board will be acting on use of this fund at second p.m. pretty soon. all project has been funded in previous cycle. for extended service levels. [captioners tran
out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually
in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> in the movie "the eternal sunshine on the spotless mind," the characters use high tech to delete painful memories. too bad we can't do that, right? new research says he may be able to. wendy walsh is here. it's very interesting, wendy. this is out of western university. they were looking for better treatments for two things, posttraumatic stress disorder and drug addiction. why those two very different things? isn't a memory a memory? >> no, because those two disorders, if you will, both involve spontaneous memories. obtrusive memories that jump in for the person with posttraumatic stress disorder, it's painful memories that interject in what now may be seemingly a pleasant day. for drug addicts, it may be environmental triggers that trigger pleasurable memories of how great that drug was. they're looking for how to suppress those kinds of memories. >> it sounds like you would want it but it's also a little bit frightening because what if they block the wrong thing or cause some
on financial aid. and it would be a tragedy if this country moves in a direction to make education less affordable. so we, as a university, are very dependent and very concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> are you also in the class from parent university? >> i do enjoy teaching. and i take every opportunity to meet with students, to talk to students, and to teach in my spare time. >> what does a provost do and how long were you at princeton? >> i was at princeton for 28 years from the time i got my ph.d. until the time i came to pan and i was on the faculty at princeton and also provost, the chief academic and chief financial officer at princeton, so the proposed works very closely with the president. >> what is the learning curve on being president of the university? >> well, the learning curve is steep for anybody, and it is also very exciting. >> how many students, give us -- >> the university of pennsylvania has 10,000 undergraduates approximately into a dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we run three hospitals. we have a great school of med
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
of the men and women who served in world war ii by caring for this memorial and by educating our visitors about the importance of world war ii in american history. as the proud son of world war ii veteran, i am honored to be entrusted with this care. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, sir. ladies and gentlemen, it is my honor to introduce the chairman of the board of the friends of the national world war ii memorial, lieutenant-general mckiliter. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us as it -- as we commemorate the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor and the beginning of world war ii. we want to welcome our distinguished guests today, admiral james winnefeld, our keynote speaker. we are also honored to have with us general px kelly, chairman of the american battle monuments commission who played a role in establishing this special monument. [applause] it is always good to have superintendent bill vogel, our cost for this to work together. also the director of the bell "honor flight" -- the film "honor flight." there are many other distinguished guests to give a
it happened and people need to be educated about that and the women were behind that when i was in the office. next item. >> next item is san francisco response to domestic violence violence and comprehensive report on domestic violence and we have the chairs here and i want to say how impressive this whole organization is because we have very much a coordinated response to domestic violence and law enforcement, the social workers, caseworkers, -- >> president soo if i might you need to take a vote on the consent calendar. >> i'm sorry. can we have a motion to approve the consent agenda? >> so moved. >> second. >> all in favor? >> aye. >> i apologize. thank you. so with the family violence council in the last year we've seen a child abuse intervention and prevention program and we were mandated and not every county has it and beverly pointed that out and alisa worked for the last six months and a year in the making to have a phone app in response to elder abuse and you push a button and brings up the resources and with they will turn it over to the ladies. >> [inaudible] for both of thes
of the reference to psas, says we are televised, we can educate the public on how to make it was reported you are involved in domestic violence. can you describe what the issues were, and how we can collaboratively address the issue? here is how it works. when there's a problem you go to the department or the commission and we address it. >> one thing that sandra had spoken about in our workshop is that there was an issue where psa may not have known severity of the walk-in who had some type of an issue. prior to me get in there. if you have an issue, and you don't speak, don't leave. the last thing we want to do is have the person leave. if this is impractical emergency, point to this. if it is something else stand by and we will either get an interpreter or line with service, that is what is going on with psa; they were being retrained on that a couple of months ago. beginning in january there are going to have a continuous professional training just like we have for advanced officers who do that every two years. >> i think i know what you exactly want. we learn that a victim ca
're a strenuous outreach campaign and public education campaign in that regard is in order, and the other aspect of this that is also delicate is that the family members who are closest and who often are the ones that take advantage are the ones there present supporting so it's a very difficult balance to strike, and maintain the support with the respect. >> commissioner. >> i would just like to echo how fortunate we are to have the women work with the commission for years but since we are giving shout outs i would like to shout out to the police department and the chief and i think it was a year ago when you created this unit and housed them on the premier floor on the hall of justice and we fought for that and without that these people wouldn't be working in unity today and i want to thank the police department and the police commission for that opportunity. >> please call the next portion of line item three please. commissioner chan. okay. >> thank you for that presentation. i appreciate it. and the approach to all of these and looking at in a comprehensive way and the 55 page family violen
public education and awareness, and ultimately outlined recommendations around three areas, energy efficiency and utility generation and the course identified five prong strategy to help achieve this goal and the first is shrink the pay. of course by reducing the amount of lktd the city demands it's easier to get to the 100% so there are a number of recommendations want a few of them are highlighted here and strengthening the retrofit rules, promoting energy audits, and through the real estate which we did a couple we go with the lead ratings and the assessors data basis and data for local governments and property owners so it's hard for the city to do smart energy and policy if we don't know where we're starting from so we need to benchmark as a city and need property owners to know what their energy use and patterns are within their own property. the second one is to encourage local renewable energy and dg distributed generation and don't need to build new transition needs and local security and keep the dollars in the local economy and to help with us there are a number of reco
accessible for people to have education. >> getting tested regularly also using condoms every day you engage in sexual activity. and having open communication with your sexual partner or partners. >> the health center offers hiv testing every day by oral swab or blood test. it costs $14. back to you guy s. >>> finals are around the corner. we'll tell you how students are preparing. >> the salvation army has a special holiday gift for the homeless. first we'll hear about what students have planned for winter break. we're throwing a concert here on campus called the triple ho show." "i am unfortunately going to be working." >> basically spend time with family and friends and work. we're throwing a concert here on campus. >> i am unfortunately going to be working. >> i'm going to be on vacation, having fun! snowboarding. >> chilling at home working and that's pretty much it. >> probably just going to go home and chill with my family. and work also. >> over winter break i'm going to be working. but i also hope to be able to get up to lake tahoe to try to snowboard. i'm actually graduating this
and this is operations project. this is a project to do bicycle and education outreach, maintenance and training classes and possibly a bike share in the bay view community. since we received the application we've been working with that sponsor and several other sponsors that do that activity. there's really no targeted planning or outreach around this project. there's some outreach done around the tdp. we want to see how the tdp start to develop. there's also a large portion of this project where they're looking at replacing some of the over headlines. getting into the next part of the recommendations. about the funding pramework, we created a project. within that target, you'll see on your page 15, first two projects, actually a little bit lower on scoring. the third project is actually gene parker elementary in district three. this project is part of the chinatown broadway phase four project. we can describe it a little more detail on the next slide. i want you to know it's within that project. all three of those projects combined and about $2.7 million. just a little bit above but enough to keep eve
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